FINANCIAL TIMES
Weekend – Collecting
Animation: György Kovásznai stars at Miami Beach

IN A FURY OF CREATION
By Emma Crichton-Miller | NOVEMBER 25, 2016
https://www.ft.com/content/d54e7a86-afd9-11e6-9c37-5787335499a0

Next week, one of the films projected on to the giant outdoor wall of the New World Center by the Miami Beach Convention Center, as part of the Art Basel Miami Beach film programme, will be Memory of the Summer of ’74. It is a poignant and painterly animated work by György Kovásznai, a little-known Hungarian artist.
......
The recent swell of international interest that has brought him to Miami Beach
gained pace in March this year, when Somerset House in London hosted a
three-day show, Kovásznai: A Cold War Artist. Animation. Painting. Freedom.
......
David Grynn, the ABMB programme’s curator, saw the “eye-catchingly seductive”
film work at the Somerset House show.
......
As Grynn puts it, “This has a magic I have not encountered before.” Grynn is not the only admirer. The London show was accompanied by a weekend symposium which included the South African artist William Kentridge.
......
Today, their energy exerts a direct appeal. As the academic and journalist
Andras Szántó said earlier this year, “Kovásznai is a message in a bottle.
It’s an extremely prescient voice that seems absolutely contemporary.”


Art Basel Announces 2016 Miami Beach Film Program
BY NICHOLAS FORREST | NOVEMBER 01, 2016
http://www.blouinartinfo.com/news/story/1666933/art-basel-announces-2016-miami-beach-film-program

Art Basel has announced a program of more than 50 films and video works for the 2016 edition of Art Basel in Miami Beach from November 20 to December 4. Selected by David Gryn, Director of Daata Editions and Artprojx, from participating galleries, the 2016 Film program features Chilean-born artist Alfredo Jaar’s first film, titled “Muxima,” Christian Marclay’s silent film about music, “Mixed Reviews (American Sign Language),” as well as a new work by Liliana Porter,
Screening at both the Miami Beach Convention Center Film Library and on a 7,000 square-foot outdoor projection wall at Soundscape Park, the program also includes short films by Edgardo Aragón, Ain Bailey and Sonia Boyce, Cabelo, Kudzanai Chiurai, Martin Creed, Keren Cytter, Kim Gordon, Rodney Graham, György Kovásznai, Rashid Johnson, Li Daiguo, Li Shurui, Jillian Mayer, Ana Mendieta, Haroon Mirza, Ara Peterson, Alex Prager, Anri Sala, Wilhelm Sasnal, Tromarama, and Samson Young, to name a few.
One of the highlights of the program will be the special screening of “Maurizio Cattelan: Be Right Back” (2016), directed by Maura Axelrod, at the Colony Theatre on Friday, December 2. The feature-length film was selected by Marian Masone, New York based film consultant and strategist, for her second year as Art Basel film curator. According to Art Basel, the film “presents a profile of the provocative and elusive art-world upstart.”
David Gryn has focused on international artists who engage with music in a variety of different ways. Gryn’s program includes a lineup of 28 short films titled “Best Dressed Chicken in Town” after Jamaican singer Doctor Alimantado’s 1970s reggae song, three early films by Polish artist Wilhelm Sasnal, and a “Double Bill” program pairing works by Christian Marclay and Rita Ackermann and Wednesday, and Alfredo Jaar and Liliana Porterc on Friday.


Wall Street International
ART

Emergency of Creativity
Joanna Bryant & Julian Page present 'Creative Fury'

3 NOV 2016 by KATE ENTERS

http://wsimag.com/art/21585-emergency-of-creativity

Joanna Bryant and Julian Page are redefining the perception of art collectors and dealers within the contemporary art world. They are a collaborative duo supporting and championing established artists and emerging talent through context-led initiatives. By finding spaces and galleries for pop-up exhibitions they dispense with the necessity of maintaining a gallery brand and instead pour their focus into curating exhibitions that stand alone. This format often reveals surprising dialogues as the exhibition is purely focussed on the art work and the curation rather than the galleries identity.
This process has also enabled freedom in the selection and curation of the exhibitions. Their latest offering will be Creative Fury at The Clerkenwell Gallery, London. An alternative showing of works by William Kentridge (b. 1955 Johannesburg) in the context of the Hungarian Cold War artist György Kovásznai (1934-83) and four mid-career contemporary artists, Marcelle Hanselaar, Yvonne Crossley, Kate McCrickard and Cally Shadbolt.
This group exhibition coincides with the Whitechapel Art Gallery’s major exhibition of William Kentridge’s work titled Thick Time. Kentridge is renowned for his animated expressionist drawings and films exploring time, the history of colonialism and the aspirations and failures of revolutionary politics. Thick Time is an exhibition of six large-scale installations where music and drama are ruptured by revolution, exile and scientific advancement.
In contrast Creative Fury is showing just one of Kentridge’s films: 9 Drawings for Projection. Compiled in 2005, this feature length film, composed of nine short animated films, is a social reflection of South Africa 1989 – 2003; spanning the transition from apartheid to democracy. Kentridge’s film begins with a single drawing that he then alters, adds to and adapts bit by bit. By photographing every change an accidental narrative appears. It is at once melancholy, graceful and open-ended which is also reflective of the labour intensive working process.
“The first animated films I made were done on the basis of trying to get away from a program in which I could see my life heading out ahead of me. So I decided I had to do something that couldn’t possibly fit into that context, that wasn’t going to be in a gallery – something for my own interest and pleasure.” (William Kentridge)
To understand the curatorial decision to place Kentridge’s work alongside Kovásznai’s it helps to explore the parallels of their lives. Kovásznai was primarily a painter, of both canvases and on the cinema screen. His unique working style also branched out into experimental animation films as he desired personal exploration outside of what was expected and known. In addition his participation and commentary on the political environment around him draws an obvious partnership with Kentridge’s work. A key example being Kovásznai’s works that reflect on the spring and summer of 1968, and the events in Paris and Prague. Paintings are shown from his short film Ca Ira: The song of the French revolution, with Marat, Saint-Just and their companions depicted as increasingly threatening figures looming on the horizon. This is a visual assault that seems very contemporary: reflective of our current political challenges and world conflicts.
Kentridge himself is aware of the parallels:
“..what felt very familiar was kind of the impetus and the essentialness and the emergency of making. That is felt like an emergency. That work has to be made non-stop…. seeing his work, my immediate thought was ‘I want to be back in the studio making something’. There was kind of a collegial fury of creation which is the main thing that I got from him.”
Alongside Kentridge and Kovásznai’s work is a selection of works that all explore similar creative concerns and passions whilst celebrating the artist’s individual paths of interest. From Marcelle Hanselaar’s exploration of human nature in all its animosity and fragility to Yvonne Crossley’s work that relates to the human figure as a way of looking at the relationship between ‘the individual’ and ‘the rest’, both as something to celebrate and as a source of anxiety. These stand strongly alongside Kate McCrikards expressive pieces. She herself states that she “likes the 'honesty' of leaving the struggle of the working process visible.”
The films of Cally Shadbolt finish the group. These operate as animated sketches, a visible thought, and provide a place in which an object can revolve, repeat or change. A perfect complement to the artistic process of Kentridge. Creative Fury is being shown at the Clerkenwell Gallery, Clerkenwell Green, London, EC1R 0DP.


Eyeworks Festival of Experimental Animation Day 2
https://www.redcat.org/event/eyeworks-day-2
nov 20. 2016

Feature screening: Habfürdő
5:00 PM
1979, 75 mins, 35mm
Shorts Program 2
8:00 PM
75 mins
16mm, 35mm, and video
Karen Aqua, Yours For the Taking, 1984
Anibal Bley, Siniestro del Jefe, 2015
Peter Burr, The Mess, 2016
Sky David, Ace of Light, 1984
Robert Frerck, Nebula II, 1969
Eri Kawaguchi, Wild Wild Ham, 2013
Ryo Orikasa, Datum Point, 2016
Mila Severtseva, Warmth of Your Body Can Save Me, 2016
Brian Smee, Lazy Daze, 2015
Jim Trainor, The Moschops, 2000
Ryoya Usuha, Open a Manhole Cover While Walking, 2015
Jacques Verbeek & Karin Wiertz, The Case of the Spiral Staircase, 1980
The Jack H. Skirball Series is curated by Steve Anker and Bérénice Reynaud and supported, in part, by the Ostrovsky Family Foundation.


MANCHESTER ANIMATION FESTIVAL 2016 UNVEILS INDUSTRY EXCELLENCE AWARD AND NOMINEES
nov 14th, 2016

http://showmetheanimation.com/off-the-press/manchester-animation-festival-2016-unveils-industry-excellence-award-and-nominees/

Mackinnon and Saunders, the puppet making and animation studio behind Frankenweenie, Corpse Bride and Fantastic Mr Fox has today revealed their latest creations for the Manchester Animation Festival. The festival will this year present the Industry Excellence Awards with awards specially designed by the studio.
The industrial themed awards have each been etched and then hand finished by the studio in heavy brass plate making each one unique.
The Industry Excellence Awards celebrate contributions to the industry outside auteur and student film making, focussing on industry contributions such as writing for animation, storyboarding and character animation for commissioned films. Nominations for these categories are:
Writing for Animation
Mr Bean: Super Bean – Alex Collier
Puffin Rock: Just Like Mama – Sara Daddy
Danger Mouse: Greenfinger – Mark Oswin and James Griffiths
The Ollie and Moon Show: Pilot – Robert Vargas
Storyboarding for Animation
#ShakespeareLives – Macbeth – Bianca Ansems
SMITE ‘To Hell & Back’ – Stuart Bayley
Puffin Rock: The First Snow – Mireia Serra Puig
Character Animation
Bristol Ageing Better – Jane Davies
SMITE ‘To Hell & Back’ – Will Eades
More Stuff – Simone Giampaolo
#ShakespeareLives – Hamlet – Oana Nechifor
The awards will be complimented by workshops in the categories with Brown Bag staff writers Jim Nolan and Liam Farrell, acclaimed storyboard artist Jez Hall and Blue Zoo character animator Bader Badruddin all uncovering tips and tricks of the trade to delegates attending their workshops. The winners of the awards will be revealed alongside the winners of the short film, short shorts, commissioned film and student film categories at the awards ceremony on Thursday 17th November, hosted by Oscar nominated director Barry Purves.
Taking place at HOME in Manchester, the festival which the BFI is supporting with National Lottery Funding as part of its audience development activity, will play host to a wide ranging programme celebrating animation. Highlights include marking Aardman Animation’s 40th Anniversary with co-founders Peter Lord and David Sproxton who will be picking up the festival’s fellowship award; Blue Zoo Animation Studio will premier their latest VR short Hoo Doo and director Catherine Salkeld will present a masterclass with producer Tom Box and BAFTA nominated director Chris Shepherd will take us on a journey through his career sampling the work that makes him a ground breaking director.
The BFI backed Ethel & Ernest, based on the award-winning book by acclaimed British author and illustrator Raymond Briggs, is a hand drawn animated feature film which is anintimate, engaging and affectionate depiction of the life and times of his parents. Lupus Films director Roger Mainwood, producers Camilla Deakin and Ruth Fielding and Animation Director Peter Dodd join us to discuss in depth the making of the film.
In Your Own Time will look at how these passion projects can become prominent productions with BAFTA Winner Mike Mort presenting an evolution of his character Chuck Steel, from a schoolboy sketchbook to the big screen next year with a special preview of the feature Night of the Trampires. At 25 years old Batty, Berry and Mackinnon’s The Sandman is just as haunting and influential today as it was in 1991, Ian Mackinnon will join the panel for a retrospective discussion of the film alongside Mort and Aardman co-founders Peter Lord and David Sproxton who will present some early Aardman treasures
UK animation veteran Chris Shepherd will present a masterclass of his work. From his early films such as The Broken Jaw, to his multi-award winning Dad’s Dead, Who I Am and What I Want and The Ringer, Chris’s films offer a forthright and darkly comedic commentary on today’s society and will be screened at the festival
In the Frame: Women in Animation will see leading female industry figures debate and discuss the role of women on screen and behind the scenes in what promises to be a lively and thought provoking session that includes screenings and a panel discussion. Folimage will be in attendance to present Phantom Boy whilst Brigitta Ivanyi-Bitter and Professor Paul Wells bring to life the art and craft of Hungarian cold-war painter, experimental filmmaker and writer György Kovásznai. Feature film screenings at the festival include Phantom Boy, The Red Turtle with a special video introduction by director Michael Dudok de Wit, Ethel and Ernest and a 35mm screening of the Ray Harryhausen classic Clash of the Titans which celebrates it’s 35th anniversary this year. Illuminating documentary Floyd Norman: An Animated Life also screens.
Manchester Animation Festival has also added a special preview of the Claude Barras directed My Life as a Courgette. Due to be released in UK cinemas next year, the glorious stop motion about a 9 year old nicknamed Courgette who goes to live in a foster home after a tragic accident won the prestigious Cristal at Annecy in June. Despite a colourfully juvenile aesthetic, My Life as a Courgette is a mature story that deals with the complicated issues of growing up in a sensitive, thought-provoking and humorous way. The film will screen on Tuesday 15 November.
Also added to the line-up is Philip Hunt, creative director of Studio AKA. Hunt directed the BAFTA winning Lost and Found, based on the book by Oliver Jeffers. Lost and Found will screen at the festival as part of a retrospective screening of the studio’s finest work which includes Marc Craste’s BAFTA winning Jojo and the Stars and Varmints and Grant Orchard’s Academy Award nominated A Morning Stroll.
The Ray and Diana Harryhausen Foundation will also be setting aside time to “Meet the Creatures” in a session where collections manager Connor Heaney and trustee John Walsh will bring the puppets of Medusa and Calibos from Clash of the Titans to the festival, giving delegates the chance to get up close and personal with the puppets and pose questions to the experts.
Manchester Animation Festival returns to HOME Manchester on the 15, 16 and 17 November 2016. Full details on the events and information about day passes, full festival passes and individual tickets for the festival are available from the website www.manchesteranimationfestival.co.uk


MANCHESTER ANIMATION FESTIVAL ANNOUNCES 2016 PROGRAMME
sept 24, 2016
http://www.manchesteranimationfestival.co.uk/manchester-animation-festival-announces-2016-programme/

We’ll be returning to HOME after a highly successful first year that saw sell out performances, screenings and events led by key figures from the world of animation, attracting a total of over 4,400 attendances over 3 days.
This year Aardman Animation co-founders Peter Lord and David Sproxton will be celebrating 40 years of the studio as they are presented with the festival fellowship award, we’ll also screen a selection of their classic films.
Lupus Films will give audiences a behind the scenes look of their recent adaptation of Raymond Briggs’ masterpiece Ethel and Ernest, a BFI-backed film which will be released in the UK on 28 October. French studio, Folimage, best known for their award winning feature A Cat in Paris, will be welcomed to Manchester to present their latest project Phantom Boy. There will also be a unique opportunity to discover the technique and technology behind Blue Zoo’s immersive virtual reality short Hoodoo which will premiere at the festival. Ground-breaking UK director and producer Chris Shepherd will also present a masterclass and retrospective of his work.
Panel discussions include In the Frame: Women in Animation which promises a lively debate focusing on the representation of women in animated films, whilst In Your Own Time discovers the passion and determination behind seminal projects such as The Sandman with co-creator Ian Mackinnon, the explosive Chuck Steel with creator Mike Mort and the early years of Aardman presented by the company’s founders. Kovásznai: A Cold War Artist brings to life the art and craft of Hungarian cold-war animator György Kovásznai and the Ray & Diana Harryhausen Foundation share some of the treasures of their vast collection with a screening of the rarely seen short film Ray Harryhausen and Me, presented by foundation trustee John Walsh. We also takes a look at the latest animation books that dissect the world of animation and meet the authors behind them in Book Your Ideas Up.
We’re thrilled to have a special preview of Michael Dudok de Wit’s critically acclaimed Studio Ghibli co-production The Red Turtle. The fascinating documentary about determined Disney animator Floyd Norman: An Animated Life also plays. Other screenings include Ethel and Ernest, Phantom Boy and an anniversary screening of the Ray Harryhausen classic Clash of the Titans screening from a 35mm print.
Not to be missed the competition screenings have been selected from over 900 entries, representing 63 countries celebrating the fantastic international wealth of animated achievement in the Commissioned Films, Short Films, Short Shorts and Student Films. Each of the categories will be awarded a prize each, the magnificent “Bee Award” created by master model makers Mackinnon and Saunders. The newly introduced Industry Excellence Awards will award individual contributions to Writing, Storyboarding and Character Animation the awards are complimented by special workshops hosted by Andrew Burrell (Script Editor/Writer Danger Mouse), Jez Hall (Storyboard Artist Cosgrove Hall, Brown Bag Films) and character animator Bader Badruddin (Character Animator Blue Zoo). BAFTA-winning animator Joanna Quinn will be hosting a Life Drawing Workshop and online animation magazine Skwigly.com will host The Skwigly Screening featuring fantastic short films as well as presenting The Skwigly Animation Podcast LIVE from the festival and their always popular Animation Quiz.
Manchester Animation Festival takes place at HOME on from 15 – 17 November 2016.


still-bubblebath-300x300

Habfurdo
http://m.chicagoreader.com/chicago/habfurdo/Film?oid=24251372

With a title that translates as "Foam Bath," this feature-length animation (1979) by Hungarian painter and filmmaker György Kovásznai reveals a gift for jazzy, kaleidoscopic storytelling. A nervous groom in Budapest tells his fiancee's best friend that he wants to call off the wedding; the story's premise may be relatively simple, but its rendering is elaborate and protean, with a zippy pace that demands close attention and jittery, shape-shifting visuals that can be difficult to track. Often the characters' emotions are externalized—expanding, shrinking, fragmenting, and restyling, sometimes from one shot to the next. The film, with its dense, layered backgrounds and trippy score by János Másik, is a challenge to sit through, which makes it all the more exciting. In Hungarian with subtitles. By Leah Pickett

 

 

 

18. Tartsay Vilmos str.,

Budapest | Hungary

1126

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18. Tartsay Vilmos str.,

Budapest | Hungary

1126

 

E-Mail

info@kovasznai.org

 

MEDIA

Copyright © 2007-2016

Kovasznai Research Center Foundation

All Rights Reserved.